No Excuses, Huh?

(From BSMW member Claude45)

How about all the reasons you and your d-bag co-hosts keep hammering us with:

– Belichick the GM sucks
– Horrible Drafts
– Letting Welker go
– Kraft is cheap
– Brady is DUN
– Window is closed
– Denver’s ALL IN !!!!!
– The game has passed Belichick by on defense
– They can’t win a rock fight
– They play too many close games
– Lousy free agent signings
– They can’t draft and develop wide receivers
– They missed on Amendola
– They traded the heart and soul in Mankins (which would inevitably lead to Brady getting KILLED!!!)
– Trading draft picks for guys would be cut anyway
– Waiting for guys to get cut and pick them off the scrap heap instead of being AGGRESSIVE. STOP MESSING AROUND AND GET SOME GUYS IN HERE TO WIN SOME GAMES!!!!
– Brady does not care about football anymore. Just banging Giselle and fashion week.
– They will never recover from losing Scar
– Belichick surrounds himself with only yes men, needs a strong voice in the room
– Too many Rutgers guys
– They hate Gooch
– They have a tuba player on the OL
– They don’t have a signature road win in 4 years
– ARROGANCE!!!!
– The Jets passed them by (while somehow remaining a tomato can)
– Wasting a second round pick on a QB who won’t play for years INSTEAD OF GOING FOR IT!!!
– Tough stretch schedule with no tomato cans
– Inexperienced DB coach
– Coaches from Division III schools!
– NO PLAYMAKERS!!!!

Based on your football acumen, the Pats are huge underdogs to hang on for the number 1 seed, Tony. It will be a miracle or I may start to think you don’t know what you are talking about.

Ron Borges Caught In Another Lie, Mazz Making Stuff Up, and Peter King’s Laughable Rationalization

Just another day in the world of the Boston sports media.

In the morning, we had Pete Sheppard taking on Ron Borges on the Dennis and Callahan Morning Show. Borges, as usual sounded like a raving madman, screaming, yelling and cursing on the air- getting bleeped out, shouting down any accusations or points made against him. As far as defenses go, its a reliable one, if you’re on the offensive and changing the talking points every two seconds, it’s going to be hard to build that stable case against you in the short time you have on the air.

Of course, the case against Borges was made a long time ago, and it has only been added to since.

One accusation that Sheppard made was that Borges had had dinner at Drew Bledsoe’s house, and how this closeness was part of the reason Borges turned on Bill Belichick so venomously when Belichick named Brady the starter even when Bledsoe was ready to return in 2001.

Borges went ballistic on Sheppard, screaming, asking what evidence he had of this supposed dinner, and when pressed on it yelled “NO I DIDN’T” and demanded again to have Sheppard reveal evidence.

Here’s your evidence, Ron: From Drew Bledsoe himself:

So there you go. Yet another documented case of Ron Borges lying.

Gerry Callahan was his usual loathsome self during the show,  at one point dropping into his whiny, feminine voice to say that Sheppard would now be wearing a fireman’s helmet to the games and leading the cheers of P-A-T-S, PATS!

When the topic of Tom Coughlin and Eli Manning throwing the ball on the Packers with five minutes to go came up, the goalposts were shifted again, instead of it being only the evil Patriots and Bill Belichick that do this, it became “we’re only concerned with Tom Brady and him getting hurt.

In the afternoon, Tony Massarotti spent the afternoon yelling that Jermaine Cunningham was clearly much bigger than he was in previous seasons and that the suspension was definitely not for Adderall.  He presented absolutely zero evidence of this, and really,  how could he? How much is he around the team? I’m not convinced that he even watches the games.

Meanwhile, if you want to know about Adderall, and why NFL players might want to take it, and why it is banned, Tom E Curran has it all.

A GIS search of Cunningham shows no obvious changes in his body since joining the Patriots. Some modest increase in strength, but no Barry Bonds-like transformation. Yet Massarotti was screaming that if you didn’t see, it, you’re an idiot, a moron and just plain stupid.

I continue to be baffled as to way anyone who actually enjoys sports and their teams would listen to this type of programming willingly. I’m clearly old-school, maybe not this old school, but definitely from before the time when sports radio only existed to dump on the local teams 24/7.

The running-up-the-score hypocrisy will not die. Peter King in his MMQB, Tuesday Edition answered an email from a New England NFL fan:

BELICHICK DOES IT ALL THE TIME. COUGHLIN, NOT SO MUCH. “How about a team that is up by four touchdowns (38-10) with five minutes left and keeping the starting quarterback in and is STILL throwing the ball? Man, that Belichick is one evil…. oh wait… that was Tom Coughlin and Eli Manning against Green Bay Sunday night. When it’s not Belichick, the moral outrage goes away, right?”
– Tom, Portsmouth, N.H.

It’s a little different. Belichick’s done this often over the years. You need more than one hand to count the times Tom Brady’s been in a total blowout in the middle of the fourth quarter. But Coughlin had a reason, I believe. His offense had been struggling for four weeks, and he has every right to use the game to do what he can to make sure his team is back on track for the stretch run. People wouldn’t be killing Belichick if it were a one-time occurrence. Obviously, it’s not.

My mind is still spinning at this.

It’s OK for Coughlin to use a real, live game to work on things to make his team better and make sure they’re in top form for the postseason. Bill Belichick does it, and it’s just out of spite and poor sportsmanship. Got it.

I mean, it’s not like Saint Tony Dungy ever did this sort of thing with Peyton Manning. Oh, wait.

I think this might be the more accurate explanation for why only Belichick gets flayed for this.

The other thing to wonder is how often are other teams even in this position? It’s all well and good to say that Coughlin, or any other coach doesn’t leave their QB in with a 35-point lead, or isn’t passing under five minutes with a 35-point lead. How many teams routinely have 35-point leads?

Still on the Patriots, with the Gil Santos era winding down, the subject of his replacement is gaining momentum.

John Rooke, The Obvious Choice To Take Over For Gil Santos – Derek Havens looks at why Rooke and his 20 years of working for the Patriots make him the best choice for the job. I’m on-board with this, certainly if it keeps Gary Tanguay or Jon Meterparel away from the gig.

Meanwhile, Red Sox reporters are waiting for something to happen.

Abraham of course, wrote a Lester column himself, but that was sort of his point. Right now, the Red Sox media is jumping on any scrap of information and writing about it.

I thought Abraham and Chad Finn had a nice 1-2 punch on the Jon Lester for Wil Myers rumor(?) Is it even a rumor? Speculation?

Lester for a prospect? Here’s why it’s crazy – Abraham

Jon Lester for Wil Myers? Why not? – Finn

Just What Is A “Produced” Touchdown?

This drab little note in Peter King’s Monday Morning Quarterback column this week has provided considerable fodder for the likes of Felger of Mazz.

Opposing passers have produced more touchdowns than Tom Brady, 19-18.

This is just a weird sentence. “Produced more touchdowns?” What is the definition he’s using here?  Solely passing TD’s?

If we’re going by strictly “passing” yes, opposing QB’s have thrown 19 TDs, and Tom Brady has thrown 18. Brady also has two rushing touchdowns this season, and Kevin Kolb in week two rushed for a touchdown against the Patriots.

It would seem logical that “produced” by the quarterback would also include TD’s scored personally by the quarterback. So when we get there, we’re at 20-20 on the season.

By using this stat, some (Felger and Mazz) have made the completely inexplicable leap to the conclusion that Brady has or is losing it, and the Patriots have lost the advantage they had of having Tom Brady as quarterback. They’re going by King’s 19-18 stat (Has Dan Shaughnessy jumped on that one yet?) and saying that the QB doesn’t even matter.

Whoa.

Just another example of the surface-deep analysis you get from the likes of these guys.

The Patriots have 14 rushing touchdowns on the season. That’s the most in the NFL, by the way. (By way of comparison, opponents have five.) That’s 32 offensive touchdowns. Again, that’s the most in the NFL. Does the QB only produce the passing ones? He has nothing to do with drives that end in rushing touchdowns?

So what if Tom Brady had thrown for 27 touchdowns at this point and the team had rushed for five? Same 32 touchdowns. Would Peter King and Felger and Mazz be happy with that?

The likes of Felger and Mazz would be bewailing the absence of the running game that could prolong Brady’s career. They’re too reliant on Brady, they don’t have any balance to their offense!

The Patriots have enough problems right now. The quarterback isn’t one of them. Bending stats and not giving the entire picture is just fraudulent muck-raking, something some around here are very proficient in.

Playing Stupid And Making Big Bucks – The Life Of A Sports Media Superstar

INT. MASSAROTTI HOME – 8:00 P.M. APRIL 11TH

A weary TONY arrives home after a long, arduous day in the 98.5 The Sports Hub Studios.

TONY

Honey, I’m home!

MRS. MASSAROTTI

Hi Dear! I just put the kids to bed, and your dinner is in the oven. How was your day?

TONY
(sighs)

Just another day at the office. I made a complete and utter fool of myself, just as I am paid to do. I actually made the statement that Rajon Rondo’s 18 point, 15 assist performance against the Heat is proof that he is NOT a great player in this league!

MRS. MASSAROTTI
(confused)

Um, OK.

TONY
(squeaking excitedly)

YES! Because if he WAS a great player, he’d do that every night! See? It’s brilliant! I totally ignore the part where he’s had double-digit assists in 19 straight games – the longest streak in the NBA in 20 years! I also ignore the part where, since 1986 there have only been seven triple-doubles with at least 10 points, 10 rebounds and 20 assists and Rondo has the last five of them! Not a great player! I sounded so dumb!

MRS. MASSAROTTI
(placatingly)

Well honey, you know we’re still really proud of you..

TONY
(interrupts)

Wait, there’s more! I’m learning, I really am. Instead of “You’re absolutely right, Mike.” I’m learning to mix it up a little, saying things like “No doubt, Mike.” and “Listen Mike, I can’t argue that.” I’m really getting a grip on this whole “play dumb on the radio” role! I also insulted the Celtics fans, and suggested that maybe, just maybe the team is “juiced up” and then Mike and I suggested that Terry Francona is just like Josh Beckett. He’s only interested in finding the snitch, not admitting that he really was a drug-addled philanderer like Hohler said he was!

MRS MASSAROTTI
(sighs)

Well, today was payday, right? You’re such a good provider for the kids and I. Even if you do refer to them as “little monsters” in that Dragon Naturally Speaking commercial you do. How much did you make off that again? Never mind, I can see you’re exhausted from thinking so much today.

TONY
(relaxes)

Thanks honey. I do it all for you guys. It not always easy playing a complete imbecile, but the pay makes it worth it. You know what I’ve decided to post on Twitter tomorrow morning?

EXT. TONY’S COMPUTER 8:39 A.M. TODAY

[blackbirdpie id=”190418910011588609″]

2011 Approval Ratings – Tony Massarotti

Tony Massarotti is the co-host of the Felger and Mazz show on 98.5 The SportsHub.

A Waltham native, Massarotti also hosts The Baseball Reporters on 98.5, and is a Boston.com sports columnist. He joined the Boston Herald as a sports intern in 1989, joining the likes of Michael Felger, Bill Simmons, Michael Silverman and Paul Perillo. In 1994 he started covering the Red Sox for the Herald, a focus he held until he left the paper in 2008. He then joined Boston.com, and in August 2009, he and Felger started their popular afternoon drive show on 98.5, which has unseated long time ratings champ Glenn Ordway and The Big Show on WEEI. Interestingly, Massarotti, like Felger had been a frequent co-host on the WEEI show in the past. The duo signed a new deal with the station in April of this year.

Once a dogged and capable baseball reporter, Massarotti now focuses on playing the contrarian, especially when it comes to the Patriots – a franchise and fan base that he clearly loathes. He has also proclaimed his love for Derek Jeter, and does an absolutely horrible voice impression of Boston sports fans.

Massarotti  has written or co-written several books, including Dynasty: The Inside Story of How the Red Sox Became a Baseball Powerhouse, as well as bios with Tim Wakefield

 

Tony Massarotti 2011 Approval Ratings
Total Votes: 1409 Started: July 20, 2011 Back to Vote Screen

Avoiding Super Bowl Media Crush No Easy Feat

Much of the time, I tend to take a very Boston-centric view to the sports world. While I certainly keep up with the sports world outside of New England, there much out there that I could take or leave. The Super Bowl media hype for a game not involving the Patriots is one of those. Especially when much of the media focus seems intent on trying to compare Ben Roethlisberger to Tom Brady or trying to determine the real “team of the decade” – even though we’re firmly in a new decade by this point.

When Sunday comes, I’ll be watching the game, but until then, I’m not too interested in the coverage leading up to it. I can’t avoid it, but that doesn’t mean I’m enthralled by it.

Patriots should think outside the system – Mike Reiss does tie a Super Bowl angle to the Patriots, looking at pass rushers LaMarr Woodley and Clay Matthews, both of whom were available to the Patriots in the draft, and wonders if it is time for Bill Belichick to adjust his thinking on the position.

Twitter’s got the NFL by the tail – Tom E Curran has an interesting look at the problems that Twitter is causing for the NFL, as the league can’t control the things being tweeted by its players.

Management was so impressed with Tony “Miserable” Massarotti’s straw-man-laden Boston.com column yesterday – “Don’t Count The Lakers Out Yet” that they repackaged it and put in the Globe sports section today – “Too early to plan Celtics parade.” I’m wondering exactly who these people are who are counting the Lakers out and already planning the Celtics parade route for June.

Some, like Chris Forsberg, are writing that the Celtics the best, and getting better – but no one is saying that they are unbeatable and are a lock to win the NBA title. Gerry Callahan writes today that the Celtics are Leaving it all on floor – but he also acknowledges the possibility that the Celtics could “run out of gas and come up short of a championship.”

It’s just like Massarotti to take a very convincing and satisfying victory and do his best to discount it and make fans miserable.

Did Kevin Garnett Turn Down A Ball Boy With A Bin Laden Reference? – Deadspin.com follows up on the disappearing Tweets of J. A. Adande and Marc J Spears about KG’s treatment of a Lakers ball boy. They report:

Twitter being what it is is also what led both writers to take down the messages within minutes of being posted. We’re told that the sheer number of people retweeting the messages — thousands of them — were overwhelming the writers, making Twitter unusable. The easiest thing to do was to simply delete the Tweet and move on, the news already having been put out there.

So there you go. No misquotes, no warnings from Big Brother Stern. Just the limits of mobile technology.

I don’t know about you, but that doesn’t sound just right to me.  Adande in particular doesn’t tweet enough for this to impact his ability to use Twitter. Deleting the original message has a limited impact. If people are using a third-party twitter client – which many people do – the message is still going to appear. Most of those clients also have the ability to turn off viewing of retweets, an option that the writers could’ve used to keep on working. There was no limit of mobile technology in play here. Limited knowledge by the user, perhaps, not the technology.

Celtics aiming to keep focus – Julian Benbow has the Celtics looking to avoid a letdown in Sacramento.

Red Sox brass discuss Pedroia, Yanks, TV ratings – Sean McAdam reviews the Red Sox “town meeting” held last night. Michael Vega  and Alex Speier also cover the event.

Sox just want Beckett to be Beckett – Scott Lauber says that management doesn’t want Beckett to try to do too much.

Bruins find a keeper in Steve Kampfer  – Joe Haggerty examines the circumstances which led to the defenseman landing in Boston.

Bruins may shut down Marc Savard – Joe McDonald has Peter Chiarelli acknowledging that shutting down the center might be the best decision.

Globe Staff Going Whole Hog On Brady Holdout

C’mon guys.

The Boston Globe. Allegedly THE paper of record for New England sports, is embarrassing themselves with this Tom Brady holdout garbage.

Albert Breer’s lede on the Extra Points blog:

With all the noise of a Tom Brady holdout (which I hear pretty strongly isn’t happening … and was never happening), it’s worth asking this question: How could it really come to this?

Um, what? Yeah, How could it really come to this which was never happening? Does that lede even make a modicum of sense?

Breer then goes on to quote colleague Chris Gasper, who has a few gems of his own:

He shouldn’t have to threaten not to show up to camp to get a new contract.

What threats would those be? The ones solely created by the media to “move the needle?”

The Patriots are playing a dangerous game here with their most valuable asset.

As far as I can tell, they’re not playing any game here.

The CBA has become a rather convenient bit of CYA for the Patriots not to cut Brady a big, fat check.

Right. That’s really all it is. How stupid does he think they are?

Tony Massarotti took his whack at the situation earlier this week…practically begging Brady to hold out. Not only hold out, but not play the entire season.

Meanwhile, Peyton Manning sits in the exact same situation. The only difference being he’s getting a higher base salary than Brady. But isn’t he also risking $50 million dollars by showing up for Colts camp?

Congratulations, Boston Globe, for abandoning any real reporting in favor of trying your hardest to simply stir the pot.

Massarotti Chat Deconstructed

Tony Massarotti held a chat on Boston.com today, and there were a few items of interest to come out of the session.

Here’s one noteworthy exchange:

12:42 [Comment From BruschiJersey]
Mazz – you often seem to insult Boston fans, and imply that none of them see the faults of their own teams, why do you despise all of us so much?

12:44 Tony Massarotti:: What? I don’t despise anyone. I believe in open, honest discourse. I don’t believe in being a homer or a blind loyalist as I don’t think that accomplishes anything. The best relationships have some give and take, self-criticisms, etc. Why is everybody so sensitive?

So being a homer or blind loyalist doesn’t accomplish anything, but being a contrarian on everything, and being critical just to stir people up is productive? Help me out here.

As far as being sensitive, this is the guy who complained about how the younger player never “asks about you, the way any grounded person would. He never asks you for a movie tip or restaurant recommendation.”

Later in the chat, he was asked about the steroid issue:

12:13 [Comment From Nick MD]
Is it safe to say that we can now assume that David Ortiz took steriods? He is having the classic steriod breakdown that players have. Thoughts?

12:14 Tony Massarotti:: I don’t think we can “assume” anything until there is a reason to. I am very reluctant to make these sorts of accusations without some definitive proof. That’s why most media people don’t just throw names out there. Too risky.

So wait, the other day he criticizes the Boston fans for having “spent relatively little time wondering about the ramifications” of the steroid era on our players while “in our cozy little cocoon.”

But at the same time, we can’t make assumptions, or accusations, especially against the guy Tony wrote a book with. I see.

And more:

12:55 [Comment From Janice Harwood]
Tony, why isn’t anyone looking deeper into this reported meeting with the Duquette Sox where a doctor may have spoken to players about the advantages of using steroids in front of a consenting front office? Was there any buzz about this practice back then where you were covering the team? And was there any buzz about Manny Ramirez’s activities back in 2002-2008 that could have been reported on?

12:57 Tony Massarotti:: I think we are looking deeper, but it’s hard to prove one person’s word versus another. Merloni has clarified his statements some, saying the team never “promoted” steroids so much as they were aware that use existed. I think we all knew that, but it’s a different matter when a player (or former player) says it. To me, it’s akin to a HS rally on drug use. We KNOW kids are using; we just don’t know which ones.

12:58 Tony Massarotti:: At the time, I can assure you there was no buzz. And if there was something shady about Manny that we knew of, we would have reported it.

12:58 Tony Massarotti:: Still, criticisms of the media during the steroids area are legitimate. We didn’t understand the magnitude of the problem, either, until it was too late. Shame on us.

Wait, is KNOWING (but not really) the same as assuming, or not? I’m confused. So it’s fine to assume in general but not in specifics? How does that work?

He says there was no “buzz” about Manny, yet we’re the suckers for believing that he was clean while here?

The last bit the media not understanding the magnitude of the problem reads good at first glance, but did they not understand it, or did they just ignore it? The guy who reported about seeing all the stuff in Mark McGwire’s locker, Steve Wilstein was villified and treated as an outcast by his media colleagues for what he reported.

“Shame on us” – Not “me,” Nothing saying “I screwed up” but making into a collective act, without personal responsibility.

Still, it’s better than nothing. I doubt however, that we’ll see that kind of admission in a column.

Tony Massarotti Shows That He Hates The Fans Again

I’m loathe to even link this, but Tony Massarotti has proven once again, that yes, he does hate you.

  • You “cheer for laundry above all else. “
  • You have a “tendency and willingness to look away when something like this happens” – referring to Manny Ramirez’s suspension, of course.
  • You won’t examine “whether the Red Sox cheated their way to a world title” because it is “far too messy a task.”

Yes, Massarotti asserts, Manny Ramirez was “almost certainly” using PEDs during his stay in Boston too, but the fans won’t acknowledge that.

I’ll just ask one question. Where was the intrepid Tony Massarotti when this was all going down right on his own beat? He chides the Boston fans for believing their own players were clean, yet he never reported otherwise. Massarotti was on the Red Sox beat during the height of the steroid era. All this was supposedly happening right under his nose. We never heard him say a word about it.

But it is the fans who are blind.

Do we really think Massarotti would’ve ratted out anyone in the Red Sox clubhouse had he known about it? As the wise man Butch Stearns once said, I’m not so sure about that.

And as far as the Red Sox “cheating their way to a world title,” apparently he hasn’t read the work of his Boston.com colleague Chad Finn, who stated last Friday that It is ludicrous to suggest that yesterday’s sad revelation has any bearing whatsoever on the Red Sox’ world championships in 2004 and 2007.

Finn, unlike Massarotti, does a little homework, and notes that every single World Series champion between 1995 and 2004 had, at the very least, one player who has since been associated with steroids or other PEDs.

If people want to bring the Red Sox down, than all those other teams are coming down, too.

Tony ‘Miserable’ Massarotti In Top Form

We knew that Tony Massarotti hates the Patriots and their fans, and he has continued his slanted coverage of them in his new role at the Boston Globe.

While his Red Sox coverage is generally shiny and positive, his Patriots postings consist of things like Tony’s Top 5 most disturbing statistics about the Patriots. You know, Patriots fans probably aren’t feeling all that great already, and Tony feels the need to pile on more misery, even though the season has already gotten as disturbing as it can be. Now that posting is from a few days ago, and I just now got around to seeing it. Lucky me.

His first statistic is an old standby.

With Tom Brady as his starter, Bill Belichick has a career record of 87-24. Without Brady, Belichick is 43-58. As Bill Parcells might say, you are what you are. As Belichick might say, it is what it is.

How many times is this going to be trotted out there? First used by Ron Borges, this stat has been repeated over and over and over again by the self-proclamed “objective” members of the meda.

How come no one says: “With David Ortiz on his roster, Terry Francona has a career record of 468-338. Without Ortiz, Francona is 285-363. As Bill Parcells might say, you are what you are. As Belichick might say, it is what it is.”

How about: “With Kevin Garnett on his roster, Doc Rivers has a career record of 66-16. Without Garnett, Rivers is 273-312. As Bill Parcells might say, you are what you are. As Belichick might say, it is what it is.”

No, you don’t hear either of those. It’s only Belichick that this stuff gets applied to.

I prefer to turn it around and say Belichick’s career record without stiffs like Bernie Kosar and Drew Bledsoe is 105-46. (Something like that anyway…I’m counting the second half of the ’93 season after Kosar was cut, and all of the ’94 and ’95 seasons, and not counting the first 18 games of his New England career when Bledsoe was the QB.)